Livia Marin / Lecture

04/12/2014

Yet another excellent and captivating lecture, I really enjoyed how she presented her work and I really loved Marin’s work and use of materials in which I saw several similarities in her work with mine in terms of the creative use of materials.

Marin is an artist, originally from Chile but now based in London. Her practice is with everyday object as she has an interest in material process – the time spent making the object, the relationship we as humans have with objects and for this reason Marin has an excellent acumination of objects which she collects from various places such as markets and oddity shops.

She then began to discuss some of her art works, the first being “Fictions of a use II” from 2007. This piece used lipsticks as the object-Marin individually shaped over 600 lipsticks into various forms; these were then displayed together on an oval, light box type plinth, image below. I really liked these pieces, I felt that is was obvious how much time and effort went into shaping each lipstick, I really like seeing artworks that look handmade, I feel they have more physicality and as a viewer, I can connect to the piece more-which is apparent in all her other works.

("Fictions of the Use II" - 2007 -  uses around 600 lipsticks, individually formed to create unique shapes, presented on an lighted, oval plinth)
(“Fictions of the Use II” – 2007 – uses around 600 lipsticks, individually formed to create unique shapes, presented on an lighted, oval plinth)

Marin then went onto talk about her works with ceramics; these are by far my favourite pieces she has created. The inspiration for these works, which she said in the lecture was “how we react with objects when they break, we replace, mend and restore them”, this then creates a real fragility around the objects-which Marin incorporates in these works. The first piece she discussed was “The Missing Willow” – 2010 – these are a collection of oval shaped, silkscreen prints of broken plate pieces, which was exhibited at the Saatchi Gallery, I really like how these pieces are of broken objects, yet they remain visually intact. My favourite piece Marin has created in relation to the ceramics is called “Broken Things” from 2009. These pieces are small scale sculptures of ceramic wares-e.g. cups, mugs, dishes – that have the effect that they have melted, which is very effective visually and also contextually, as ceramics rarely melt, so it’s quite interesting to see this. The melted ceramic is actually resin, that Marin has then replicated the patterns on the cups and hand painted them, so her attention to detail, especially on these pieces is impeccable, and I think the overall piece is extremely effective – pieces I highly admire.

( A piece from Marin's "Broken Things" project - 2009 - uses broken ceramic objects, resin for the melted effect which she has hand painted to match the pattern on the ceramic object)
( A piece from Marin’s “Broken Things” project – 2009 – uses broken ceramic objects, resin for the melted effect which she has hand painted to match the pattern on the ceramic object)

Marin’s ceramic works are pieces I find incredible both visually and in the sense that she is giving infinite life to the broken object. This aspect is also apparent in more of Marin’s work especially the piece named “Soft Toys” (2013) where she has found soft toys and then coated them in metallic coating, giving then an antique look as though they  had been lost for several years – it almost looks quite ghostly as if they are in their afterlife.  I find these pieces so appealing and interesting as Marin coats them exactly how she finds them – these slight imperfections resemble time fractures to me as though these soft toys were so close to the child, that time has stopped for the child – these pieces are a way of remembering it, a memory which I find so emotional especially due to the lack of details on them, they almost become untouchable.

( A piece from Marin's "Soft Toy" project - 2013 - using soft toys she finds, coated in a thick metallic liquid, which sets)
( A piece from Marin’s “Soft Toy” project – 2013 – using soft toys she finds, coated in a thick metallic liquid, which sets)

Overall, I thought this lecture was truly fascinating, I found Marin’s work was amazing, the idea that she wants to ‘transform the everyday’ through her work is very apparent.  Her use of materials is extremely interesting and the way she depicts emotion is truly fantastic.  Marin has quickly become an artist that I hold high regard to.

 

Livia Marin – “Broken Things” – http://www.houseofpropellers.com/docs/livia_marin.html

 

//Images used:

1st – http://www.arte-sur.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/DSC_0004.jpg
2nd – http://lnx.ceebee.it/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/livia-marin-broken-things.jpg
3rd – http://www.galeria-impakto.com/catalog/foto/images/Artists/Livia%20Marin/Gallery/Soft%20Toys%20(v).jpg

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